How to use with Canon 100mm macro and/or MP-E 65???

Shooting in macro mode, techniques, tips & tricks

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KENTGA

How to use with Canon 100mm macro and/or MP-E 65???

Unread postby KENTGA » 21.04.2008 00:49

Bought it (Halicon Focus) but haven't tried it yet. With a zoom or "regular" lens, the subject would remain the same "size" as you change focus, but with a fixed macro or MPE 65 lens, as you change focus the "size" of the subject changes. Do you use a focusing rail to move the camera and lens (and not adjust the lens) for macro work with macro lenses (including the MPE 65)? If not what do you do?

Thanks in advance.

Kent

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Ariel
Posts: 115
Joined: 26.10.2006 06:05

Unread postby Ariel » 22.04.2008 22:54

Many people do use a rail.

Guest

Unread postby Guest » 01.05.2008 20:34

Kent,

The program does a good job of re-sizing the individual images in a stack. If you are using a macro lens that can be focused then you will probably not see much, if any, difference by using either method... a) refocus lens between shots; or b) moving camera or subject in small increments between shots.

TomMeeks
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Joined: 05.09.2006 00:10
Contact:

Re: How to use with Canon 100mm macro and/or MP-E 65???

Unread postby TomMeeks » 05.05.2008 21:51

KENTGA wrote:Bought it (Halicon Focus) but haven't tried it yet. With a zoom or "regular" lens, the subject would remain the same "size" as you change focus, but with a fixed macro or MPE 65 lens, as you change focus the "size" of the subject changes. Do you use a focusing rail to move the camera and lens (and not adjust the lens) for macro work with macro lenses (including the MPE 65)? If not what do you do?

Thanks in advance.

Kent

I use a rail for my shots with the 100mm. The important thing, however, is to not move the flash when moving the camera. Moving the flash is where the biggest differences will be seen. I found this to be true when using a ring light, so now I set up my lights, in fixed positions, just as one would for a portrait, only on a smaller scale.

BrianS
Posts: 39
Joined: 03.09.2008 15:00
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Have you tried tethered shooting?

Unread postby BrianS » 03.09.2008 15:14

Hi Kent,

I generally shoot jewellery with my 100 - 2.8 macro. I don't know which Canon your using but if your fortunate to have one of the later models with LiveView than you just gotta try tethered shooting!!

I have a 40D and a 1Ds III, often use the 40D for macro as the crop factor gets me closer.

I used a rail when I just had a 20D, but the focus adjustment steps in tethered mode on the PC are much better. I've found the 100mm has tiny USM focus steps. This presents Helicon Focus with a very clean set of focus steps (I'm trialing it - much faster than CZM)

Tethered shooting has changed my life!! :)

Cheers

Brian

hondoguy
Posts: 28
Joined: 11.09.2008 17:44
Location: Austin, Texas
Contact:

shooting tethered

Unread postby hondoguy » 11.09.2008 17:55

Could someone fill me in on shooting tethered? Is this done so you can see the image on your computer monitor as you shoot? Can you do it with a Canon 5D? What do I need to do it?

Also, I use a Sigma 150mm f/2.8 macro, and I notice the change in image size is dramatic as I change focus manually during a macro capture series. Would I avoid this image size change (or at least reduce it) if I used a focusing rail? And if I do, can I use my 150 Sigma with it or do I need a different lens?

I am a long time Pro, but rather new to shooting macros w/Helicon Focus.

Thanks.

Guest

Not with 5d

Unread postby Guest » 12.09.2008 05:25

Hi Hindoguy,

Unfortunately the 5D does not have Live view, so you cannot see the image on screen before you shoot, or do live on screen focussing.
The EOS Capture 1.5 software for the 5D allows changes of shutter, aperture, ISO WB etc, however these are rarely changed whilst shooting a macro sequence.
The 5d images will be displayed on screen in DPP once shot, which is certainly better than reviewing on the camera.

This link also has some basic advice on macro shooting, although I'm sure most of it will not be new to you. Added bonus - the writer uses the Sigma 150 2.8 as well!
http://www.macrophotographyforbeginners.blogspot.com

Focussing rails are discussed in the May 2008 section. To answer your question re image size, this will not change as much (although perspective will). Helicon Focus handles image size change admirably so it doesn't really matter.
The rail (depending on the model) will make it easier to have finer control over focus steps.
Note: Unless you buy a focussing rail that can connect to the cameras auto focus connectors, you'll lose control over aperture and your Sigma lens will be wide open at F2.8, which won't be much use to you.
The extra money for one with connections will be worth it.

Of course if you planning a camera purchase (the next 5d should be out anytime!) then Live View tethered shooting beats a rail hands down IMHO.

Hope this helps

Brian

BrianS
Posts: 39
Joined: 03.09.2008 15:00
Location: Melbourne, Australia

oops must not have been logged in

Unread postby BrianS » 12.09.2008 10:32

That last was from me, didn't realise I wasn't logged in!

BrianS


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